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Article
Problem gambling within the non-Indigenous population of the Northern Territory of Australia: a multivariate analysis of risk factors
International Gambling Studies
  • Martin Young, Charles Darwin University
  • Matthew Stevens, Charles Darwin University
  • Mary Morris, Charles Darwin University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2008
Peer Reviewed
Peer-Reviewed
Abstract
This paper estimates, through the use of a telephone survey and the Canadian Problem Gambling Index (CPGI), the prevalence of gambling and problem gambling among the non-indigenous population of the Northern Territory, Australia. Multivariate predictive models of regular and problem gambling group membership were constructed using socio-demographic and gambling mode variables. Of the socio-demographic variables, household type (particularly being single or living in a group household) was a predictor for both gambler types. In addition, male gender and formal education below tertiary level were associated with regular gambling. Gambling mode proved to be of greater explanatory power for both groups. In particular, electronic gaming machines (EGMs) were strongly associated with problem gambling. While these results provide a necessary knowledge base, the gaps they highlight are as valuable as the empirical results they provide. Any comprehensive understanding of risk factors in demographically distinctive jurisdictions such as the Northern Territory requires a broader approach; one that meaningfully extends beyond the non-indigenous population.
Citation Information

Young, M, Stevens, M & Morris, M 2008, 'Problem gambling within the non-Indigenous population of the Northern Territory of Australia: a multivariate analysis of risk factors', International Gambling Studies, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 77-93.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14459790701870571