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Article
A grounded theory of connectivity and persistence in a limited residency doctoral program
Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association
  • Martha M. Snyder, Nova Southeastern University
  • Steven R. Terrell, Nova Southeastern University
  • Laurie P. Dringus, Nova Southeastern University
Event Location / Date(s)
New Orleans, LA / April 7-11, 2011
Document Type
Poster
Presentation Date
4-7-2011
Disciplines
Description
Limited-residency doctoral students in a school of computer and information sciences at a large private university in South Florida historically maintain an attrition rate significantly higher than the national average. This study ethnographically investigated personal and academic experiences of dissertation students in an attempt to identify potential causes of attrition. Analysis of interviews from 17 currently enrolled students led to a grounded theory that postulates the lack of student-to-student connectivity, as well as student perceptions of slow faculty–to-student, are major issues of concern. Suggestions are made for the development and use of an online learning management system to ameliorate the problem.
Citation Information
Martha M. Snyder, Steven R. Terrell and Laurie P. Dringus. "A grounded theory of connectivity and persistence in a limited residency doctoral program" Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/martha_snyder/8/