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Article
Real Teaching and Real Learning vs Narrative Myths About Education
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education
  • Marshall W Gregory, Butler University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2007
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1474022207072197
Abstract
All real classrooms are saturated in the fictional narratives about education from TV and movies that swirl about thickly and persistently in western culture, yet the influence that these fictions exert on real teachers and real students is seldom examined. This article argues that since these fictional narratives nearly always deal in recycled stereotypes of both students and teachers, and that since they seldom receive critical attention, the influence they exert on real teachers and real students is to mislead, confuse, and impoverish their evaluations of and expectations about the nature of genuine education.
Rights

This is a post-print version of an article originally published in Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 2007, Volume 6, Issue 1.

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The version of record is available through: Sage.

Notes

The final, definitive version of this paper has been published in Arts and Humanities in Higher Education , 6 (1), 2007 by SAGE Publications Ltd, all rights reserved. © Marshall Gregory. http://ahh.sagepub.com/

Citation Information
Marshall W. Gregory. "Real Teaching and Real Learning vs Narrative Myths About Education" Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 6.1 (2007): 7-27.