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Article
Events gone bad: Ramifications and theoretical reasonings
The international journal of sport and society
  • Robin Pentecost, Griffith University
  • Mark T. Spence, Bond University
  • Sudhir Kale, Bond University
Date of this Version
1-1-2011
Document Type
Journal Article
Publication Details

Published Version.

Pentecost, R., Spence, M. T., & Kale, S. (2011). Events gone bad: Ramifications and theoretical reasoning. The international journal of sport and society, 2(2), 1-11.

Access the publisher's website.

2011 HERDC submission. FoR code: 150501, 150404

© Copyright Robin Pentecost, Mark T. Spence & Sudhir Kale, 2011

Disciplines
Abstract

The extent to which events are sustainable is an issue of considerable importance (Andersson, and Getz, 2008). While it may be that many do not adopt a marketing orientation (Mayfield & Crompton, 1995; Lade & Jackson, 2004; Mehmetoglu & Ellingsen, 2005) due to their more socialistic not-for profit nature there are still other factors that need to be addressed as sustainability will often depend upon the political and tangible support of key stakeholders (Andersson, and Getz, 2008). Using stakeholder theory and commitment-trust theory as applied to the events marketplace and taking a case study approach, this paper critically evaluates a major international motor sports event and the factors leading up to its demise along with its social, organisational, and political ramifications.

Citation Information
Robin Pentecost, Mark T. Spence and Sudhir Kale. "Events gone bad: Ramifications and theoretical reasonings" The international journal of sport and society Vol. 2 Iss. 2 (2011) p. 1 - 11 ISSN: 2152-7857
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/mark_spence/9/