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Article
The Art of Subversion in Inquisitorial Spain: Rojas and Delicado by Manuel da Costa Fontes (review)
Languages Faculty Publications
  • Mark J. Mascia, Sacred Heart University
Document Type
Book Review
Publication Date
1-1-2006
Abstract

Scholars with an interest in Fernando de Rojas’ La Celestina (1499) and Francisco Delicado’s La Lozana andaluza (1528), which share in common a converso authorship, are certainly at no loss for critical perspectives on these works. However, one significant, but less studied aspect of these two works, is the subversion of Christian dogma. As critical attention has often focused on the sexually subversive aspects of these works, readers may be surprised to know just to what extent Rojas and Delicado parodied certain beliefs central to their new religion, a feat accomplished during the early and vigilant years of the Inquisition. Manuel da Costa Fontes’ The Art of Subversion in Inquisitorial Spain examines precisely this issue. This highly interesting work of scholarship will appeal to specialists in Medieval and Renaissance Spanish literature and in Sephardic Jewish civilization and culture, and also to students interested in expanding their knowledge of Medieval and Golden Age Spain or of Christian-Jewish relations.

Comments

Review of The Art of Subversion in Inquisitorial Spain: Rojas and Delicado by Manuel da Costa Fontes.

Citation Information

Mascia, M. J. (2006). The art of subversion in inquisitorial Spain: Rojas and delicado by Manuel da Costa Fontes (review). Calíope: Journal of the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry,12(1), 107-111. The Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry. Retrieved from Project Muse database.