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Article
Emotion, Satire, and a Sense of Place: Two Spanish Rivers in Lope de Vega’s Sonnets
Languages Faculty Publications
  • Mark J. Mascia, Sacred Heart University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2009
Abstract
The article presents a critique of sonnets that appear in the books "Rimas humanas" (1602), "Rimas humanas y divinas del licenciado Tomé de Burguillos (1634)," by Lope de Vega (1562-1635), particularly focusing on the Spanish rivers Betis, or Guadalquivir River, and the Manzanares River, which appear in the poems. Emphasis is given to the emotional significance of the rivers in the poems, Lope's move from Baroque literary conventions to the Petrarchan mode, and the figure Lucinda, who represents Micaela de Luján, one of Lope's lovers.
Citation Information
Mascia, Mark J. “Emotion, Satire, and a Sense of Place: Two Spanish Rivers in Lope de Vega’s Sonnets.” Romance Notes 49.3 (2009): 267-276.