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Article
Physical webbing: Group construction of three-dimensional mindmaps to build understanding and knowledge.
Humanities & Social Sciences papers (2008)
  • Marian Williams, Bond University
Abstract

In an effort to make the learning strategy of Mind Mapping more experiential, an instructional strategy, termed Physical Webbing was devised. In the Physical Webbing activity, groups collaboratively build concrete (physical) representations of abstract content using kinesthetic or participatory manipulatives. The learning strategy of Mind Mapping is predominantly used on an individual basis and is most often paper-based. Therefore, using three-dimensional materials to collaboratively build abstract information into a concrete Mind Map enables students to experience the information in a concrete, tactile manner. The theoretical underpinnings of the Physical Web include Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory, Brain-based Learning principles and Papert's Constructionist Theory. A case study example of the implementation of the Physical Webbing process delineates a specific application and provides procedures for replication and expansion of the strategy. Qualitative analysis of surveys following the experiential activity provided evidence regarding the success and benefits of the incorporation of the Physical Webbing activity.

Keywords
  • mind mapping,
  • physical webbing,
  • teaching strategy
Publication Date
December 1, 2008
Publisher Statement
Interim status: Citation only.

Williams, M. H. (2008). Physical webbing: Group construction of three-dimensional mindmaps to build understanding and knowledge. Paper presented at the 11th International Conference on Experiential Learning, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. Retrieved from http://www.education.uts.edu.au/icel/index.html

Access the conference website.

2008 HERDC submission

© Copyright Marian H. Williams 2008
Citation Information
Marian Williams. "Physical webbing: Group construction of three-dimensional mindmaps to build understanding and knowledge." Humanities & Social Sciences papers (2008)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/marian_williams/3/