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Article
The “I” in the Gene: Divided Property, Fragmented Personhood, and the Making of a Genetic Privacy Law
American Ethnologist (2008)
  • Margaret Everett, Portland State University
Abstract
In this article, I explore the making and remaking of Oregon's Genetic Privacy Act, one of the first genetic privacy laws passed in the United States. New genetic technologies have provoked debates about medical privacy and property rights to the body and products derived from the body, and a majority of states have passed legislation regarding the use and disclosure of genetic information. Research in medical anthropology has increasingly focused on the politicized and fragmented body in modern science. As genetic privacy debates demonstrate, however, not only is the body increasingly subject to fragmentation but the property and privacy interests in bodies, body parts, and products derived from bodies are also increasingly subject to division. This article is based on my role as a member of two statewide advisory commissions from 1999 to 2005, the recordings and minutes of their meetings, legislation, testimony from legislative hearings, media coverage of the debate in Oregon, and letters to the editors of local newspapers.
Disciplines
Publication Date
January, 2008
Citation Information
Margaret Everett. "The “I” in the Gene: Divided Property, Fragmented Personhood, and the Making of a Genetic Privacy Law" American Ethnologist Vol. 34 Iss. 2 (2008)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/margaret_everett/6/