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The Case for Moral Complexity
Judging and Understanding: Essays on Free Will, Narrative, Meaning and the Ethical Limits of Condemnation
  • Marc L Fellman, University of Notre Dame Australia
Document Type
Book Chapter
Publication Date
1-1-2006
Abstract
In this chapter Marc Fellman seeks to situate the tension between judging and understanding, as it is understood in Bernhard Schlink’s The Reader, within the context of a discussion on the tension between moral complexity and moral enormity within Holocaust experiences. His claim is that the tension between judging and understanding is best understood as symptomatic of a more generalized tension between complexity and enormity, at least when it comes to understanding the Holocaust. ISBN: 9780754653950
Comments

The author's final version is available for download.

Judging and Understanding: Essays on Free Will, Narrative, Meaning and the Ethical Limits of Condemnation may be accessed from the publisher here

Judging and Understanding: Essays on Free Will, Narrative, Meaning and the Ethical Limits of Condemnation may be accessed as a Google Book from the National Library of Australia here

Citation Information

Fellman, M. (2006). The case for moral complexity. In P. A. Tabensky (Ed). Judging and understanding: Essays on free will, narrative, meaning and the ethical limits of condemnation. (pp. 111-125). Aldershot, United Kingdom: Ashgate Publishing.