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Presentation
Does consistency pay? The effects of information sequence and content on women’s negotiation outcomes
Academy of Management (2014)
  • Carol T Kulik, University of South Australia
  • Mara Olekalns, Melbourne Business School
  • Emma T Swain, University of Melbourne
Abstract
Women are usually perceived as warm or competent, but rarely both. This research investigates how the sequence and content of warmth-relevant relational information and competence-relevant performance information affects female negotiators’ social (perceptions of their warmth and competence) and economic outcomes. Female employers (but not male employers) rated a negotiating female employee as high warmth when they received relational information first and were able to discount the employee’s competence with a team-based relational attribution (E1) or when they received performance information first and were convinced the employee’s warm behavior was genuine (E2). The sequence and content of warmth-relevant and competence-relevant information interacted with employers’ first impressions to affect the employee’s negotiation outcomes. When performance information was presented first, the female employee’s distributive outcomes benefited from high-competence impressions with female employers but from low-competence impressions with male employers (E1); her distributive outcomes were harmed by authentic warmth in negotiations with male employers (E2). When relational information was presented first, the female employee’s distributive outcomes suffered as a result of converging information about high-competence (E1); integrative outcomes benefitted when relational information was offset by impressions of low, instrumental warmth (E2). The results suggest that pre-negotiation information can help women to preserve their social outcomes (perceptions of warmth) in a negotiation context.
Keywords
  • gender,
  • negotiation,
  • stereotype content,
  • social outcomes
Publication Date
2014
Citation Information
Carol T Kulik, Mara Olekalns and Emma T Swain. "Does consistency pay? The effects of information sequence and content on women’s negotiation outcomes" Academy of Management (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/mara_olekalns/33/