Skip to main content
Article
The Effects of Self-Construal and Religiousness on Argumentativeness: A Cross-Cultural Analysis
Communication Studies (2010)
  • Stephen M. Croucher, Bowling Green State University
  • Deepa Oommen, Bowling Green State University
  • Manda V. Hicks, Bowling Green State University
  • Kyle J. Holody, Bowling Green State University
  • Samara Anarbaeva, Bowling Green State University
  • Kisung Yoon, Bowling Green State University
  • Anthony T. Spencer
  • Chrishawn Marsh, Bowling Green State University
  • Abdulrahman I. Aljahli, Bowling Green State University
Abstract

Christians and Muslims were recruited from France (n = 600), Britain (n = 568), and the United States (n = 1,176) to complete a survey assessing the relationship between argumentativeness and an individuals' self-construal. Correlation analysis revealed the relationships between self-construal, argumentativeness, and religiousness were significantly opposite those predicted. Hierarchical regression modeling results revealed national and religious identification to each have significant effects on the relationship between self-construal and argumentativeness. Religiousness did not have a significant effect on the relationship between argumentativeness and an individual's self-construal. Overall, an individual's culture was shown to significantly influence one's level of argumentativeness.

Keywords
  • Argumentativeness,
  • Cross-Cultural,
  • Religiosity/Religiousness,
  • Self-Construal
Disciplines
Publication Date
2010
Citation Information
Stephen M. Croucher, Deepa Oommen, Manda V. Hicks, Kyle J. Holody, et al.. "The Effects of Self-Construal and Religiousness on Argumentativeness: A Cross-Cultural Analysis" Communication Studies Vol. 61 Iss. 2 (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/manda_hicks/3/