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Article
The Right to Know?: Delimiting Database Protection at the Juncture of the Commerce Clause, the Intellectual Property Clause, and the First Amendment
Cardozo Arts & Ent. L.J. (1999)
  • Malla Pollack, American Justice School of Law
Abstract

The people of the United States have a constitutional right to know; the government has a duty not to block access to information. The First Amendment and the Intellectual Property Clause cabin the Commerce Clause. Congress cannot create a quasi-property right to exclude others from information without clearly demonstrating market failure. Sui generis protection of data bases does not meet this threashold requirement.

Keywords
  • free speech,
  • copyright,
  • constitution,
  • database protection
Disciplines
Publication Date
August, 1999
Publisher Statement
Author holds copyright. Permission is given for any use in return for a citation.
Citation Information
Malla Pollack. "The Right to Know?: Delimiting Database Protection at the Juncture of the Commerce Clause, the Intellectual Property Clause, and the First Amendment" Cardozo Arts & Ent. L.J. Vol. 17 (1999)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/malla_pollack/16/