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Article
Clinician-targeted interventions to reduce antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory infections in primary care: an overview of systematic reviews (Protocol)
Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
  • Sarah K.G. Tonkin, Oxford University
  • Kay Wang, Oxford University
  • Oliver van Hecke, Oxford University
  • Nia W Roberts, Oxford University
  • Amanda McCullough, Bond University
  • Malene Hansen, Bond University
  • Christopher C. Butler, Oxford University
  • Chris Del Mar, Bond University
Date of this Version
1-1-2016
Document Type
Journal Article
Publication Details

Citation only

Tonkin-Crine S. K. G., Wang K., van Hecke O., Roberts N.W., McCullough A., Hansen M.P., Butler C.C., Del Mar C.B. (2016). Clinician-targeted interventions to reduce antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory infections in primary care: an overview of systematic reviews (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 6 (CD012252), 1-10. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD012252.

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Copyright © 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Abstract
This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To systematically review the literature and appraise the existing evidence from systematic reviews regarding the effects of interventions, aimed at changing clinician behaviour, to reduce antibiotic prescribing for ARIs in primary care. EXTRACT: Antibiotic resistance is recognised as a major threat to human health worldwide (WHO 2015). Each year in the USA, at least two million people become ill with antibiotic-resistant infections and at least 23,000 people die as a direct result of these infections (CDC 2013). People with infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria are generally at increased risk of worse clinical outcomes and death, and consume more healthcare resources than people infected with the same bacterial species that are not drug-resistant (WHO 2015). Estimates suggest that an additional 10 million deaths may occur by 2050 from drug-resistant bacterial infections. In addition, by the same time point, such infections could cost the global economy around USD 100 trillion, through a reduction in overall economic production as a result of mortality and morbidity in the labour force (RAR 2014). A recent evaluation also identified that previous research, which estimated the cost of antimicrobial resistance at USD 55 billion year in the USA, may have underestimated the cost of antibiotic resistance and that the real cost may be much higher (Smith 2013).
Citation Information
Sarah K.G. Tonkin, Kay Wang, Oliver van Hecke, Nia W Roberts, et al.. "Clinician-targeted interventions to reduce antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory infections in primary care: an overview of systematic reviews (Protocol)" Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Vol. 6 Iss. CD012252 (2016) p. 1 - 10 ISSN: 1469-493X
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/malene_hansen/17/