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Article
Ontogenetic Partial Migration Is Associated with Environmental Drivers and Influences Fisheries Interactions in a Marine Predator
ICES Journal of Marine Science
  • James S. E. Lea, Nova Southeastern University; Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom; Marine Research Facility - Saudi Arabia; University of Plymouth - United Kingdom
  • Bradley M. Wetherbee, Nova Southeastern University; University of Rhode Island
  • Lara L. Sousa, Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom; CIBIO - Universidade do Porto - Vairao, Portugal; University of Southampton - United Kingdom
  • Choy Aming, Bermuda Shark Project - United Kingdom
  • Neil Burnie, Bermuda Shark Project - United Kingdom
  • Nicolas E. Humphries, Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • Nuno Queiroz, Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom; CIBIO - Universidade do Porto - Vairao, Portugal
  • Guy Harvey, Nova Southeastern University
  • David W. Sims, Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom; University of Southampton - United Kingdom
  • Mahmood S. Shivji, Nova Southeastern University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-4-2018
Keywords
  • Animal telemetry,
  • Conservation,
  • Environment,
  • Fisheries,
  • Foraging,
  • Galeocerdo cuvier,
  • Migration,
  • Modeling
Abstract

The ability to predict animal movement based on environmental change is essential for understanding the dynamic nature of their spatial ecology, and in turn the effectiveness of conservation strategies. We used a large marine predator that displays partial migration (the tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier) as a model to test the role of oceanic conditions in predicting the space-use of different size classes. By using generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs), we revealed that environmental variables (sea surface temperature, primary productivity, thermal fronts, and bathymetry) had much greater predictive power for the movements of large, migratory tiger sharks than for small, resident individuals. We also found that coverage of tiger shark movements within “shark sanctuaries” (protected areas specifically for sharks) in the northwest Atlantic could be increased from 12 to 52% through inclusion of Bermuda’s waters. However, as large tiger sharks are migratory, over 80% of potential longline fisheries interactions would still occur outside the boundaries of even the expanded protected areas. This emphasises that management of highly migratory species needs to be dynamic and account for changing interactions with fisheries over time, which in a changing climate may rely on predicting movements based on oceanic conditions to be effective.

Comments

©International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 2018. All rights reserved.

Additional Comments
Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia grant #s: PTDC/MAR/100345/2008, SFRH/BD/68717/2010; FCT Investigator Fellowship grant #: IF/01611/2013
ORCID ID
0000-0002-3753-8950
DOI
10.1093/icesjms/fsx238
Citation Information
James S. E. Lea, Bradley M. Wetherbee, Lara L. Sousa, Choy Aming, et al.. "Ontogenetic Partial Migration Is Associated with Environmental Drivers and Influences Fisheries Interactions in a Marine Predator" ICES Journal of Marine Science Vol. fsx238 (2018) p. 1 - 10 ISSN: 1054-3139
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/mahmood-shivji/168/