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Article
Investigation of the Effects of Nutrition Education on the Lifestyles of Third-Grade Children and their Parents
Social Thought and Research
  • Natalia Frishman, Iowa State University
  • Mack C Shelley, Iowa State University
  • Doris Montgomery
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2013
DOI
10.17161/STR.1808.12436
Abstract

The current study assessed improvement in healthy lifestyles of third-grade children from Iowa schools who participated in nutrition education lessons provided by the Iowa Department of Public Health’s Building and Strengthening Iowa Community Support for Nutrition and Physical Activity (BASICS) program in 2009. The program encourages children to eat more fruits and vegetables as snacks and to be active every day. Autoregressive models and logistic regression analysis results showed that the BASICS program improved awareness of the “Pick a better snack™ & Act” campaign among children and their parents. The program also led to children’s increased preferences toward fruits, vegetables, and low-fat milk products, and to parents’ increased willingness to offer healthy foods to their children. The program stimulated children’s desires to be physically active and parents’ attentiveness toward children’s physical activity. These results indicated that the children influenced their parents’ recognition of campaign materials and how often their parents provided them with fruits and vegetables. Increasing parent age negatively influenced the probability of children receiving free and reduced-price lunch, reflecting the better economic situation of families with older parents.

Comments

This article is from Social Thought and Research 32 (2013): 47, doi:10.17161/STR.1808.12436. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner
Department of Sociology, University of Kansas
Language
en
File Format
application/pdf
Citation Information
Natalia Frishman, Mack C Shelley and Doris Montgomery. "Investigation of the Effects of Nutrition Education on the Lifestyles of Third-Grade Children and their Parents" Social Thought and Research Vol. 32 (2013) p. 47 - 69
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/mack_shelley/32/