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Article
Social Support and Self-Concept in Relation to Peer Victimization and Peer Aggression
Journal of School Violence (2012)
  • Lyndsay N. Jenkins, Eastern Illinois University
  • Michelle Kilpatrick Demaray, Northern Illinois University
Abstract

Peer victimization is an enduring problem in schools (Wang, Iannotti, & Nansel, 2009). The current study focused on relations among two ecological variables that may be related to involvement in peer victimization: self-concept and social support. The main goal of this study was to investigate relations among social support, self-concept, and involvement in peer victimization (both as a victim and aggressor). The sample included 251 students in Grades 3–5. There was a significant negative relation between social support and peer victimization (β = –.22, p < .05) as well as a significant, negative relation between self-concept and peer victimization (β = –.24, p < .05). For peer aggression, there was a significant negative relation between social support and peer aggression (β = –.49, p < .001) as well as a significant, positive relation between self-concept and peer aggression (β = .23, p < .05).

Keywords
  • social support,
  • self-concept,
  • peer victimization,
  • peer aggression,
  • elementary school students,
  • self-esteem
Disciplines
Publication Date
2012
Citation Information
Lyndsay N. Jenkins and Michelle Kilpatrick Demaray. "Social Support and Self-Concept in Relation to Peer Victimization and Peer Aggression" Journal of School Violence Vol. 11 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lyndsay_jenkins/6/