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Article
The use of body mass changes as a practical measure of dehydration in team sports
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
  • Gemma Harvey, Southern Cross University
  • Rudi A Meir, Southern Cross University
  • Lyndon O Brooks, Southern Cross University
  • Kate M Holloway, Southern Cross University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2007
Peer Reviewed
Peer-Reviewed
Abstract
Body mass changes, hematocrit, specific gravity and urine colour were recorded during two games of soccer to determine which of these methods was the most practical in a field setting for monitoring dehydration. Members (n=13) of a premiership soccer team with a mean age of 22.6 (+/-4.9) years old, height of 177.8 (+/-7.1)cm and sum of skinfolds (four sites) of 37 (+/-12.8) were invited to participate in this study with 11 participating in each game. Players had weight, hematocrit, specific gravity and urine colour recorded pre- and post-game. Players were allowed to ingest fluid ad libitum throughout the matches with the amount consumed recorded. Urine excretion was also recorded and included in the calculation of final body mass loss (kg). A mean ambient temperature of 21 degrees C and relative humidity 77% was recorded for both games. Pre- and post-game body mass, sweat loss, hematocrit, urine specific gravity and colour were significantly different (p
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Citation Information

Harvey, G, Meir, RA, Brooks, LO & Holloway, KM 2007, 'The use of body mass changes as a practical measure of dehydration in team sports', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 600-603.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2007.05.012