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Unpublished Paper
A Religious, Cultural, and Economic Overview of Arranged Marriages in India and Saudi Arabia
ExpressO (2010)
  • Lucrecia A. Boado, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Abstract
This article focuses on how certain practices associated with arranged marriages in India and Saudi Arabia violate human rights. This paper provides an overview on how religion, culture, and economic aspects of arranged marriages are the source of human rights violations. The main focus is on each country’s social system and how it prevents the realization of human rights established in their ratified treaties. In India, despite numerous domestic and international laws prohibiting the practices of arranged child marriages, dowry, and dowry deaths they still continue. In Saudi Arabia, the system of male guardianship and the absence of codified marriage laws creates an environment that is more conducive to human right violations. The source of these human right violations are the social systems that prevent the simultaneous de-facto and de-jure realization of human rights. The human right violations discussed in this article are then be compared to pertinent ratified treaties, such as: The Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.
Disciplines
Publication Date
2010
Citation Information
Lucrecia A. Boado. "A Religious, Cultural, and Economic Overview of Arranged Marriages in India and Saudi Arabia" ExpressO (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lucrecia_boado/1/