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Article
'Affecting History': Impersonating Women in the Early Republic
Early American Literature (2004)
  • Lorrayne Carroll, University of Southern Maine
Abstract

It is now a critical commonplace that Early American women's captivity narratives offer scholars and students alike rich material for our postmodern investigations into subjectivity and identity. The texts' representations of gender, ethnicity, and race conveniently dovetail with current theoretical work that seeks to reinterpret and expand the canon of Early American texts.

Keywords
  • American Literature,
  • 1700-1799,
  • Hastings,
  • Mrs. Susannah Johnson (1730-1810),
  • A Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Johnson (1796),
  • Captivity Narrative
Publication Date
2004
Publisher Statement
DOI: http://dx.doi.org.ursus-proxy-1.ursus.maine.edu/10.2307_25057368 http://uncpress.unc.edu/browse/page/6
Citation Information
Lorrayne Carroll. "'Affecting History': Impersonating Women in the Early Republic" Early American Literature Vol. 39 Iss. 3 (2004)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lorrayne_carroll/7/