Skip to main content
Article
The patient exit interview as an assessment of physician-delivered smoking intervention: a validation study
Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association (1999)
  • Lori Pbert, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Abigail Adams
  • Mark E. Quirk, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • James R. Hebert
  • Judith K. Ockene, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Rose S. Luippold
Abstract
In evaluating the efficacy of physician-delivered counseling interventions for health behavior changes such as smoking cessation, a major challenge is determining the degree to which interventions are implemented by physicians. The Patient Exit Interview (PEI; J. Ockene et al., 1991) is a brief measure of a patient's perception of the content and quantity of smoking cessation intervention received from his or her physician. One hundred eight current smokers seen in a primary care clinic completed a PEI following their physician visit. Participants were 45% male, 95% Caucasian, with a mean age of 42 years and an average of 22 years of smoking. The PEI correlated well with a criterion measure of an audiotape assessment of the physician-patient interaction (r = .67, p < .001). When discrepancy occurred, in general it was due to patients' over-reporting of intervention as compared with the criterion measure. Implications and limitations of these findings are discussed.
Publication Date
April 8, 1999
Citation Information
Lori Pbert, Abigail Adams, Mark E. Quirk, James R. Hebert, et al.. "The patient exit interview as an assessment of physician-delivered smoking intervention: a validation study" Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association Vol. 18 Iss. 2 (1999)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lori_pbert/35/