Skip to main content
Other
A school nurse-delivered adolescent smoking cessation intervention: a randomized controlled trial
Preventive and Behavioral Medicine Publications and Presentations
  • Lori Pbert, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Stavroula K. Osganian, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Diane Gorak, Massachusetts Department of Public Health
  • Susan Druker, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • George W. Reed, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Katherine M. O'Neill, Framingham Public Schools
  • Anne Sheetz, Massachusetts Department of Public Health
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
Date
10-11-2006
Document Type
Article
Subjects
Adolescent; Female; Health Promotion; Health Surveys; Humans; *Interpersonal Relations; Male; Massachusetts; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Questionnaires; School Nursing; Smoking; *Smoking Cessation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a school nurse-delivered smoking cessation intervention to improve abstinence rates among adolescents interested in quitting. METHODS: Seventy-one high schools in Massachusetts were randomized to either a four-session one-on-one school nurse-delivered smoking cessation intervention (37 schools, n = 571) or usual smoking cessation care control condition (34 schools, n = 577). Adolescents in grades 9-12 who smoked in the past 30 days completed surveys at baseline, 6 weeks and 3 months. The study was conducted during the 2002-2003 school year. RESULTS: Thirty-day self-reported abstinence rates were significantly greater in students in the intervention compared to control condition at 6 weeks (18% vs. 2%, respectively) and 3 months (24% vs. 5%, respectively). After adjusting for school and potential confounders, students in the intervention schools had odds of quitting 8 times greater than students in the control schools at 6 weeks (OR = 8.4; 95% CI 3.7, 20.6) and 6 times greater at 3 months (OR = 6.4; 95% CI 3.4, 11.4). School nurses delivered intervention with a high degree of fidelity. CONCLUSIONS: A four-session smoking cessation intervention can feasibly be delivered by school nurses and increase self-reported short-term abstinence rates among students interested in quitting smoking.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Prev Med. 2006 Oct;43(4):312-20. Epub 2006 Jul 10. Link to article on publisher's site
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
PubMed ID
16828858
Citation Information
Lori Pbert, Stavroula K. Osganian, Diane Gorak, Susan Druker, et al.. "A school nurse-delivered adolescent smoking cessation intervention: a randomized controlled trial" Vol. 43 Iss. 4 (2006) ISSN: 0091-7435 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lori_pbert/28/