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Making Instructional Design Accessible in Recessionary Times: A Partnership-Based Design and Development Evaluation
33rd Annual Proceedings of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (2010)
  • Lisa Giacumo, Arizona State University
  • Amy Steeby, Arizona State University
  • Philippos Savvides, Arizona State University
Abstract
While high quality instructional design tends to be economically rewarding for organizational adopters, it also requires a substantial capitol investment that small businesses often forgo. Such deployments require relatively robust corporate budgets, which are unrealistic for most modern small businesses. Further, Paradise and Mosley (2009) report that in past economic downturns, organizational managers have tended to reduce investments in learning budgets and fail to reinstate those lost resources once the economy had recovered. The current amount of limited resources devoted towards systematic analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation, of human performance technology has begun to require instructional designers to reinvent their roles. A team of educational technologists used client coaching, scaffolding, instructional design mentoring, and open-source learning management software to meet the training needs of a client in the fitness industry.
Keywords
  • program evaluation,
  • blended learning
Publication Date
2010
Citation Information
Lisa Giacumo, Amy Steeby and Philippos Savvides. "Making Instructional Design Accessible in Recessionary Times: A Partnership-Based Design and Development Evaluation" 33rd Annual Proceedings of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology Vol. 2 (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lisa_giacumo/8/