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Article
Religious and Secular Coping Strategies and Mortality Risk among Older Adults
Social Indicators Research (2015)
  • Lindsey M. McDougle, Rutgers University - Newark
  • Sara Konrath
  • Marlene Walk
  • Femida Handy
Abstract
Using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS), the purpose of this study is two-fold. First, the study is intended to identify coping strategies used by older adults. Second, the study is intended to examine the impact of older adults’ chosen coping strategies on mortality reduction. The study focuses specifically on differences in religious and secular coping strategies used by older adults. The findings suggest that although coping strategies differ between those who selfclassify as religious and those who self-classify as non-religious, for both groups social approaches to coping (e.g., attending church and volunteering) were more likely than individual approaches (e.g., praying or active/passive coping) to reduce mortality. However, the most efficacious coping strategies, we conclude, are those matched to characteristics of the individual.
Keywords
  • voluteering,
  • coping
Publication Date
Spring January 1, 2015
Citation Information
Lindsey M. McDougle, Sara Konrath, Marlene Walk and Femida Handy. "Religious and Secular Coping Strategies and Mortality Risk among Older Adults" Social Indicators Research (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lindseymcdougle/10/