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Article
That is not what homeless is: A school district’s journey toward serving homeless, doubled-up, and economically displaced children and youth
International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education
  • Ronald E. Hallett, University of the Pacific
  • Linda E. Skrla, University of the Pacific
  • Justin A. Low, University of the Pacific
Document Type
Article
DOI
10.1080/09518398.2015.1017859
Publication Date
7-29-2015
Disciplines
Abstract
School districts play a key role in identifying, supporting, and educating homeless students. This qualitative case study of a school district in Northern California illustrates how district leadership serves as a bridge between federal policy and local school sites. In this case study, federal funding funneled through the state served as the incentive for the district to reeducate itself on what homelessness is. Four themes emerged concerning the role of districts in serving homeless students: (1) serving the needs of all students includes those who are homeless; (2) state and federal policy incentives can be an important aspect of reculturing a district; (3) once a district adjusts policy, it must make concerted effort to integrate and align other aspects of other district and school site functions; and, (4) once issues of access have been addressed, districts need to consider how to support the educational success of homeless students.
Citation Information
Ronald E. Hallett, Linda E. Skrla and Justin A. Low. "That is not what homeless is: A school district’s journey toward serving homeless, doubled-up, and economically displaced children and youth" International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education Vol. 28 Iss. 6 (2015) p. 671 - 692 ISSN: 0951-8398
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/linda-skrla/119/