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Article
Perception of speech and nonspeech stimuli by children with and without reading disability and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
Journal of Experimental Child Psychology (2002)
  • J I Breier
  • Lincoln C Gray, James Madison University
  • J M Fletcher
  • B R Foorman
  • P Klass
Abstract
The auditory temporal deficit hypothesis predicts that children with reading disability (RD) will exhibit deficits in the perception of speech and nonspeech acoustic stimuli in discrimination and temporal ordering tasks when the interstimulus interval (ISI) is short. Initial studies testing this hypothesis did not account for the potential presence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Temporal order judgment and discrimination tasks were administered to children with (1) RD/no-ADHD (n=38), (2) ADHD (n=29), (3) RD and ADHD (RD/ADHD; n=32), and (4) no impairment (NI; n=43). Contrary to predictions, children with RD showed no specific sensitivity to ISI and performed worse relative to children without RD on speech but not nonspeech tasks. Relationships between perceptual tasks and phonological processing measures were stronger and more consistent for speech than nonspeech stimuli. These results were independent of the presence of ADHD and suggest that children with RD have a deficit in phoneme perception that correlates with reading and phonological processing ability.
Keywords
  • Adolescent,
  • Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/physiopathology,
  • Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/psychology,
  • Auditory Perception/physiology,
  • Awareness/physiology,
  • Child,
  • Dyslexia/physiopathology,
  • Dyslexia/psychology,
  • Female,
  • Humans,
  • Intelligence Tests,
  • Male,
  • Phonetics,
  • Social Class,
  • Speech Perception/physiology
Publication Date
2002
Citation Information
Breier, J.I., Gray, L.C., Fletcher, J.M., Foorman, B.R. & Klaas, P. Perception of speech and nonspeech stimuli by children with and without reading disability and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 8:226-50, 2002.