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Presentation
Mistakes Rebuilt: Parallels in the Construction and Reconstruction of the World Trade Center Site, 1973 and 2003
Pacific Undergraduate Research and Creativity Conference (2006)
  • Lauren L. Gallow, University of the Pacific
Abstract
On September 11, 2001, as terrorist planes crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City, few Americans were likely thinking of the rebuilding process that would inevitably ensue. However, since the site is so deeply invested with both commercial and public interests, the project to redesign the World Trade Center has become one of the most unique and challenging revitalization projects in history. While the political and commercial forces charged with rebuilding the World Trade Center site have outwardly appeared to be heavily concerned with the outpouring of public sentiment expressed concerning this project, in reality the redesign process has been anything but public. This research project seeks to show that rather than learning from the past, these private institutions heading the revitalization project seem to be repeating the same mistakes made by the designers of the original World Trade Center in their focus on commercial interests and the ensuing rejection of public sentiment. While the architectural redesign project has the potential to create a new American icon for freedom and independence, as well as position New York City to become the first true twenty-first century city, this decision to disregard the input of the American public has left the meaning of the new Freedom Tower as a response to the terrorist attacks both ambiguous and uncertain.
Publication Date
May 6, 2006
Citation Information
Lauren L. Gallow. "Mistakes Rebuilt: Parallels in the Construction and Reconstruction of the World Trade Center Site, 1973 and 2003" Pacific Undergraduate Research and Creativity Conference (2006)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lgallow/3/