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Article
The Indian Independence Struggle (1930-1931)
International Center on Nonviolent Conflict (2009)
  • Lester R. Kurtz, George Mason University
Abstract

Mohandas Gandhi’s civil disobedience movement of 1930-1931—launched by the Salt March—is a critical case for understanding civil resistance. Although by itself it failed to bring Indian independence, it seriously undermined British authority and united India’s population in a movement for independence under the leadership of the Indian National Congress (INC). It further signaled a new stage in the struggle for Indian swaraj (self-rule) and facilitated the downfall of the British Empire in India. Gandhi’s Salt Satyagraha (a word Gandhi used to connote civil resistance, meaning “holding fast to the truth”) drew upon a traditional South Asian cultural practice – the “Padyatra” (a long spiritual march) that became a model of strategic action for many social movements in the decades to come.

Keywords
  • Gandhi,
  • nonviolent civil resistance,
  • India,
  • Indian Independence Movement,
  • colonialism,
  • anti-colonialism,
  • social movements,
  • nonviolent revolution
Publication Date
June, 2009
Citation Information
Lester R. Kurtz. "The Indian Independence Struggle (1930-1931)" International Center on Nonviolent Conflict (2009)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lester_kurtz/26/