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Article
G. Stanley Hall and an American Social Darwinist Pedagogy: His Progressive Educational Ideas on Gender and Race
History of Education Quarterly (2012)
  • Lester F. Goodchild, Santa Clara University
Abstract
President G. Stanley Hall hung only a portrait of Ralph Waldo Emerson in his office at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. The philosopher embodied Hall's most cherished mid-nineteenth century ideas that comprised part of his intellectual worldview. In the 1840s, Emerson reflected on his transcendental concepts of the common mind and instinct, which held all innate human knowledge and behavioral patterns, in his Essays. Later, Hall would believe that the human metaphysical psyche, driven by primordial instinct, offered an evolutionary font from which educational activities enabled individuals to discern their destinies and to discover their abilities. His intellectual journey began at Williams College. As an undergraduate, Hall had talked with Emerson, who had been forced to give an address in the town rather than at his college. This personal meeting with “the greatest living mind” in America allowed Hall to imbibe this radical “ultra-Unitarianism” directly, which the religious-oriented Williams faculty considered to be a very dangerous thing. Contrarily, Hall found Emerson's provocative ideas intellectually intoxicating.
Keywords
  • education,
  • G. Stanley Hall,
  • social Darwinism,
  • gender,
  • race,
  • pedagogy
Publication Date
February, 2012
Citation Information
Lester F. Goodchild. "G. Stanley Hall and an American Social Darwinist Pedagogy: His Progressive Educational Ideas on Gender and Race" History of Education Quarterly Vol. 52 Iss. 1 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lester_goodchild/1/