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Article
A Critical Analysis of Parental Alienation Syndrome and Its Admissibility in the Family Court
Journal of Child Custody
  • Lenore E Walker, Nova Southeastern University
  • Kristi L. Brantley, Nova Southeastern University
  • Justin A. Rigsbee, Nova Southeastern University; FBI Academy
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2004
Keywords
  • Parental alienation syndrome,
  • Daubert,
  • custody,
  • family violence,
  • gender,
  • psychological evaluation
Disciplines
Abstract
Over the past three decades, parental alienation syndrome (PAS) has been proposed to explain behaviors by a child who refuses to spend time with a parent and actually denigrates that parent within the context of a child custody dispute. Although some mental health professionals and child custody evaluators, attorneys, and judges have been quick to accept and admit PAS as evidence in these disputes, there has been no consistent empirical or clinical evidence that PAS exists or that the alienator's behavior is the actual cause of the alienated child's behavior towards the target parent. This article attempts to help those working with custody issues understand how the PAS construct fails to meet scientific standards and should not be admissible in courts.
DOI
10.1300/J190v01n02_03
Citation Information
Lenore E Walker, Kristi L. Brantley and Justin A. Rigsbee. "A Critical Analysis of Parental Alienation Syndrome and Its Admissibility in the Family Court" Journal of Child Custody Vol. 1 Iss. 2 (2004) p. 47 - 74 ISSN: 1537-9418
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lenore-walker/8/