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Article
Students' Knowledge and Perceived Confidence in an Interdisciplinary Experiential-Learning Environment
Journal of Community Engagement and Higher Education (2015)
  • Lee J. Florea, Ball State University
  • Adam J. Kuban, Ball State University
  • Michelle O'Malley, Ball State University
Abstract
Experiential-learning theory suggests that students acquire knowledge through hands-on learning environments, and aspiring journalists need a setting where they can experience science — its process(es) as well as how to report empirical findings. Researchers utilized pre/post questionnaires, field-notebook evaluation, and focus-group analysis as methods to assess an interdisciplinary, experiential course that combined science and media undergraduates. Results revealed students valued procedural over fact-based knowledge. Students also indicated increased perceived confidence—even when they answered questions incorrectly.
Keywords
  • Immersive learning,
  • problem-based learning,
  • experiential learning,
  • water quality
Publication Date
Spring April 2, 2015
Citation Information
Lee J. Florea, Adam J. Kuban and Michelle O'Malley. "Students' Knowledge and Perceived Confidence in an Interdisciplinary Experiential-Learning Environment" Journal of Community Engagement and Higher Education Vol. 6 Iss. 2 (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lee_florea/51/