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Article
Stability and Change in Personality Pathology: Revelations of Three Longitudinal Studies
Journal of Personality Disorders (2005)
  • Lee Anna Clark, University of Iowa
Abstract

Three major longitudinal studies of personality disorder jointly provide new insights into the nature of stability and change in this important domain of psychopathology. This commentary highlights some of the many convergent results, which indicate robust findings that can be considered “established,” and also differences in the studies' purposes and methods that permit each study to make unique contributions. One of the most important findings across the studies is that DSM- diagnosed personality disorder is not as stable as the characteristic traits that underlie personality pathology, leading to the insight that DSM personality disorders are hybrids of more acute, “Axis I-like” symptoms that resolve more quickly and longer lasting affective, cognitive, and behavioral personality dysfunctions. Implications for future research are considered

Disciplines
Publication Date
October, 2005
Citation Information
Lee Anna Clark. "Stability and Change in Personality Pathology: Revelations of Three Longitudinal Studies" Journal of Personality Disorders Vol. 19 Iss. 5 (2005)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lee_anna_clark/42/