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Article
Self- and Peer-Reported Personality: Agreement, Trait Ratability, and the “Self-Based Heuristic
Journal of Research in Personality (2000)
  • Rebecca E Ready
  • Lee A Clark
  • David Watson, University of Iowa
Abstract

Agreement between self- and peer-reported personality was investigated using the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP; Clark, 1993) and SNAP-Collateral-Report Version. Participants were 189 well-acquainted undergraduate pairs (64% female; 83.2% Caucasian; age M = 19.7 years) of either same (n = 129) or mixed gender (n = 60). Self–peer agreement correlations averaged .47 (range, .27–.62). Agreement variation across traits was associated with ratability (r = .58): Traits whose component items were judged more difficult to rate were associated with lower agreement. The degree to which the raters' own personality contributed to target ratings also was correlated negatively with agreement (r = −.60) and exhibited a strong relationship with ratability (r = −.73). Thus, when peers were asked to rate a target on difficult-to-judge traits, they reported more on their own personality, a phenomenon to which we apply the interpretive label the “self-based heuristic

Disciplines
Publication Date
June, 2000
Citation Information
Rebecca E Ready, Lee A Clark and David Watson. "Self- and Peer-Reported Personality: Agreement, Trait Ratability, and the “Self-Based Heuristic" Journal of Research in Personality Vol. 34 Iss. 2 (2000)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lee_anna_clark/18/