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Article
‘How Little I Cared for Fame’: T. Sparrow and Women’s Investigative Journalism at the Fin de Siècle
Victorian Periodicals Review
  • Laura Vorachek, University of Dayton
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
7-1-2016
Abstract
This article analyzes the work of an overlooked female journalist, T. Sparrow, arguing that her career reveals the difficulties female journalists faced when negotiating between the expectations of middle-class gentility and the demands of investigative journalism. Sparrow asserted her gentility rhetorically, in part because female reporters who took up investigative reporting were vulnerable to criticism for assaying beyond domestic subjects. Moreover, incognito investigative reporting often brought celebrity to its practitioners, which challenged the convention of middle-class female modesty. Sparrow, therefore, strove for a delicate balance in her career—assuming the stance of a middle-class woman who lived among the poor, someone who was self-supporting and well-published but still decorous and respectable.
Inclusive pages
333-361
ISBN/ISSN
0709-4698
Document Version
Published Version
Comments

This document is provided for download in compliance with the publisher's policy on self-archiving. Permission documentation is on file.

Publisher
Johns Hopkins University Press
Peer Reviewed
Yes
Citation Information
Laura Vorachek. "‘How Little I Cared for Fame’: T. Sparrow and Women’s Investigative Journalism at the Fin de Siècle" Victorian Periodicals Review Vol. 49 Iss. 2 (2016)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/laura_vorachek/13/