Skip to main content
Article
Exploring the Role of Victim Sex, Victim Conduct, and Victim–Defendant Relationship in Capital Punishment Sentencing
Homicide Studies
  • Lane Kirkland Gillespie, Boise State University
  • Thomas A. Loughran, University of Maryland - College Park
  • M. Dwayne Smith, University of South Florida
  • Sondra J. Fogel, University of South Florida
  • Beth Bjerregaard, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
5-1-2014
Abstract
Disparities in the administration of capital punishment are a prominent social and political issue. Recent studies indicate that victim characteristics of sex and race produce interactive effects on capital-sentencing outcomes. Extending this line of research, the current analysis explores the intersection of victim sex with victim conduct and victim–defendant relationship, utilizing a population of North Carolina capital cases spanning the years 1977 to 2009 (N = 1,285). Findings indicate that cases with a female victim who was not involved in illegal activity at the time of the murder and acquaintance female victim cases are most likely to result in a death recommendation. Potential reasons for these findings are discussed.
Citation Information
Lane Kirkland Gillespie, Thomas A. Loughran, M. Dwayne Smith, Sondra J. Fogel, et al.. "Exploring the Role of Victim Sex, Victim Conduct, and Victim–Defendant Relationship in Capital Punishment Sentencing" Homicide Studies (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/lane_gillespie/11/