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The use of novel foods enriched with long-chain n-3 fatty acids to increase dietary intake: A comparison of methodologies assessing nutrient intake
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)
  • Craig S Patch, University of Wollongong
  • Linda C Tapsell, University of Wollongong
  • Trevor A Mori
  • Barbara J Meyer, University of Wollongong
  • Karen J Murphy
  • Jackie Mansour
  • Manny Noakes
  • Peter M Clifton
  • I.B. Puddey
  • L.J. Beilin
  • G Annison
  • Peter Howe
RIS ID
12753
Publication Date
1-1-2005
Publication Details

Patch, C. S., Tapsell, L. C., Mori, T., Meyer, B. J., Murphy, K., Mansour, J., Noakes, M., Clifton, P., Puddey, I., Beilin, L., Annison, G. & Howe, P. (2005). The use of novel foods enriched with long-chain n-3 fatty acids to increase dietary intake: A comparison of methodologies assessing nutrient intake. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 105 1918-1926.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of consuming a variety of foods enriched in long-chain n-3 fatty acids in low fish eaters. DESIGN: Evaluation of reported dietary intakes in a 6-month, double-blind, randomized, controlled parallel design trial. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Eighty-five men and women with overweight and mildly elevated triglyceride levels who have a low habitual intake of fish. INTERVENTION: Subjects were randomized to consume foods either enriched in long-chain n-3 fats or control foods (not enriched). Subjects were asked to consume eight portions per day (equivalent to approximately 1 g/day long-chain n-3 fatty acid if randomized to the intervention). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Reported energy, macronutrient, and fatty acid intakes were measured by diet history, 3-day food records, and body weight. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Repeated measures analysis of variance, Kruskall-Wallis test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman plots were conducted. RESULTS: The two groups did not differ in mean dietary intake of long-chain n-3 fatty acid intake at baseline (258 mg and 313 mg for the intervention and control groups, respectively). At 6 months the intervention group members increased their intake of long-chain n-3 fats 4.5-fold compared with baseline and with the control group (P<.001). The data from the diet histories correlated well with the food records for all reported macronutrient and fatty acid values. Food pattern analysis showed that milk (13.8%), cereal (12.1%), and bread (11.3%) contributed the most to the overall long-chain n-3 fatty acid intake in the intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: This long-term study in free-living subjects indicates that population intakes of long-chain n-3 fatty acids could be substantially increased through the availability of a variety of n-3 fatty acid-enriched processed foods.

Citation Information
Craig S Patch, Linda C Tapsell, Trevor A Mori, Barbara J Meyer, et al.. "The use of novel foods enriched with long-chain n-3 fatty acids to increase dietary intake: A comparison of methodologies assessing nutrient intake" (2005) p. 1918 - 1926
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/l_tapsell/80/