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Article
Plant sterols as dietary adjuvants in the reduction of cardiovascular risk: theory and evidence
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)
  • C. Patch, University of Wollongong
  • Linda C. Tapsell, University of Wollongong
  • P. G. Williams, University of Wollongong
  • M. Gordon, Unilever Food and Health Research Centre, The Netherlands
RIS ID
13526
Publication Date
1-1-2006
Publication Details

This article was originally published as Patch, C, Tapsell, L, Williams, PG and Gordon, M, Plant sterols as dietary adjuvants in the reduction of cardiovascular risk: theory and evidence, Vascular Health and Risk Management, 2(2), 2006, 157-162. Copyright Dove Medical Press 2006.

Abstract
Plant sterol-enriched foods are an effective dietary adjuvant in reducing cardiovascular risk by lowering total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) in serum by up to ~15%. The mechanism of action of plant sterols is different from those of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors (statins) and thus their effect is additive. Combining plant sterols with other dietary components known to reduce cholesterol in a portfolio approach have proven to be most effective agents for reduction of hypercholesterolemia and provide an alternative treatment option for clinicians. Plant sterol-enriched foods provide clinicians with a relatively cheap, safe, and effective way to help patients manage their cardiovascular risk.
Citation Information
C. Patch, Linda C. Tapsell, P. G. Williams and M. Gordon. "Plant sterols as dietary adjuvants in the reduction of cardiovascular risk: theory and evidence" (2006)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/l_tapsell/21/