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Article
Social, economic, and residential diversity within Hartford's African American community at the beginning of the Great Migration
Journal of Black Studies
  • Peter Tuckel
  • Kurt Schlichting, Fairfield University
  • Richard Maisel
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2007
Abstract

Scant attention has been paid to the social and economic diversity within the African American community in particular cities at the beginning stage of the Great Migration. This article examines the variation in characteristics of African Americans from different places of birth at the onset of the Great Migration living in one city, Hartford, Connecticut. The article focuses on three major attributes of African Americans with differing geographic backgrounds residing in Hartford during this time period: (a) their socioeconomic status, (b) their settlement patterns within the city, and (c) the extent of their civic participation. The article reveals sizable differences along these three dimensions among African Americans of differing geographic origins.

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Copyright 2007 Sage

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Published Citation
Tuckel, Peter, Kurt Schlichting, and Richard Maisel. "Social, economic, and residential diversity within Hartford's African American community at the beginning of the Great Migration." Journal of Black Studies 37, no. 5 (2007): 710-736.doi:10.1177/0021934705282376.
DOI
10.1177/0021934705282376
None
Peer Reviewed
Citation Information
Peter Tuckel, Kurt Schlichting and Richard Maisel. "Social, economic, and residential diversity within Hartford's African American community at the beginning of the Great Migration" Journal of Black Studies Vol. 37 Iss. 5 (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kurt_schlichting/13/