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Article
The Ethics of Disclosure: The Case of the Brown and Williamson Cigarette Papers
Provenance, Journal of the Society of Georgia Archivists
  • Kurt X. Metzmeier, University of Kentucky College of Law
Publication Date
1-1-1997
Abstract
The story of the Brown and Williamson Cigarette Papers reads like a screenplay inspired by a John Grisham novel. Scene 1: In late 1992 Kentucky attorney J. Fox DeMoisey receives a bombshell, a banker's box full of documents stolen from the state's largest law firm, Wyatt Tarrant and Combs, by his client Merrell Williams. While working as a paralegal assigned to a project indexing secret documents of his firm's client, the Brown and Williamson Tobacco Company, Williams had furtively copied documents he thought demonstrated that the cigarette maker had deliberately hidden its knowledge of tobacco's lethal qualities, qualities that he believed were the cause of his current heart problems.
Citation Information
Kurt X. Metzmeier. "The Ethics of Disclosure: The Case of the Brown and Williamson Cigarette Papers" (1997)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kurt_metzmeier/21/