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Article
Racial and Gender Differences in Kin Support: A Mixed-Methods Study of African American and Hispanic Couples
Journal of Family Issues (2009)
  • Clarisse Haxton, University of Pennsylvania
  • Kristen Harknett, University of Pennsylvania
Abstract

This article uses qualitative and quantitative data for a recent birth cohort from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study to compare kin support patterns between African Americans and Hispanics. It focuses on financial and housing support from grandparents and other kin during the transition to parenthood. Qualitative analysis (n = 122 parents) uncovers distinctions in the way African American and Hispanic parents discuss their family networks, with African Americans emphasizing relations with female kin and Hispanics emphasizing a more integrated system. Consistent with these findings, quantitative analysis (n = 2,472 mothers and n = 2,639 fathers) finds that compared with Hispanic parents, African American parents are more likely to receive financial and housing support from grandmothers and less likely to receive support from both grandparents. Contrary to expectations that fathers would be the primary support recipients in Hispanic households, the authors find that mothers are the more common recipients of support among African Americans and Hispanics.

Keywords
  • African American,
  • Hispanic,
  • kin support,
  • Fragile Families,
  • mixed methods
Disciplines
Publication Date
2009
Citation Information
Clarisse Haxton and Kristen Harknett. "Racial and Gender Differences in Kin Support: A Mixed-Methods Study of African American and Hispanic Couples" Journal of Family Issues Vol. 30 (2009)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kristenharknett/10/