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A Systematic Review of Internet-Based Worksite Wellness Approaches for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Management: Outcomes, Challenges & Opportunities
Environmental & Occupational Health
  • Ehimen C. Aneni, Center for Prevention and Wellness Research, Baptist Health Medical Group, Miami Beach, Florida
  • Lara L. Roberson, Center for Prevention and Wellness Research, Baptist Health Medical Group, Miami Beach, Florida
  • Wasim Maziak, Department of Epidemiology, Robert Stempel College of Public Health, Florida International University, Miami, Florida
  • Arthur S. Agatston, Center for Prevention and Wellness Research, Baptist Health Medical Group, Miami Beach, Florida
  • Theodore Feldman, Center for Prevention and Wellness Research, Baptist Health Medical Group, Miami Beach, Florida
  • Maribeth Rouseff, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida
  • Thinh H. Tran, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida
  • Roger S. Blumenthal, The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Michael J. Blaha, The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Ron Blankenstein, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Mouaz H. Al-Mallah, King Abdul Aziz Cardiac Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  • Matthew J. Budoff, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Torrance, California
  • Khurram Nasir, Department of Medicine, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami, Florida
Date of this Version
1-8-2014
Document Type
Article
Disciplines
Abstract
Context The internet is gaining popularity as a means of delivering employee-based cardiovascular (CV) wellness interventions though little is known about the cardiovascular health outcomes of these programs. In this review, we examined the effectiveness of internet-based employee cardiovascular wellness and prevention programs. Evidence Acquisition We conducted a systematic review by searching PubMed, Web of Science and Cochrane library for all published studies on internet-based programs aimed at improving CV health among employees up to November 2012. We grouped the outcomes according to the American Heart Association (AHA) indicators of cardiovascular wellbeing – weight, BP, lipids, smoking, physical activity, diet, and blood glucose. Evidence Synthesis A total of 18 randomized trials and 11 follow-up studies met our inclusion/exclusion criteria. Follow-up duration ranged from 6 – 24 months. There were significant differences in intervention types and number of components in each intervention. Modest improvements were observed in more than half of the studies with weight related outcomes while no improvement was seen in virtually all the studies with physical activity outcome. In general, internet-based programs were more successful if the interventions also included some physical contact and environmental modification, and if they were targeted at specific disease entities such as hypertension. Only a few of the studies were conducted in persons at-risk for CVD, none in blue-collar workers or low-income earners. Conclusion Internet based programs hold promise for improving the cardiovascular wellness among employees however much work is required to fully understand its utility and long term impact especially in special/at-risk populations.
Comments

This article was originally published in PLoS ONE 9(1): e83594.

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Citation Information
Aneni EC, Roberson LL, Maziak W, Agatston AS, Feldman T, et al. (2014) A Systematic Review of Internet-Based Worksite Wellness Approaches for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Management: Outcomes, Challenges & Opportunities. PLoS ONE 9(1): e83594. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083594