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Article
Review: Bootleggers and Borders: The Paradox of Prohibition on a Canada-US Borderland
Pacific Historical Review
  • Kevin Allen Leonard, Western Washington University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
5-1-2016
Abstract

Voters in Oregon and Washington approved measures that would end the production and sale of alcoholic beverages in 1914, and Idaho followed suit in 1916. Wartime patriotism prompted British Columbia voters to approve a referendum against the sale of alcohol in 1917. In 1918 and 1919, the legislatures of forty-five of the forty-eight U.S. states ratified the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which prohibited the manufacture, sale, transportation, importation, and exportation of intoxicating liquors. A year after prohibition went into effect in the United States, British Columbia became the second Canadian province to abandon prohibition in favor of a system in which the provincial government controlled the sale of alcohol.

Citation Information
Kevin Allen Leonard. "Review: Bootleggers and Borders: The Paradox of Prohibition on a Canada-US Borderland" Pacific Historical Review Vol. 85 Iss. 2 (2016) p. 296 - 297
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kevin_leonard/63/