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Review of: Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas: Mexican Workers and Job Politics during World War II, by Emilio Zamora
Journal of Social History (2011)
  • Kevin Allen Leonard, Western Washington University
Abstract

At first glance, this book’s narrow focus suggests that it will interest only specialists in the history of the home front during World War II, the history of Mexicans in the United States, or the history of Texas. However, Emilio Zamora’s goals are remarkably ambitious. Zamora sets out to add to the small but growing body of literature that internationalizes both the history of Mexico and the history of the United States. He also seeks to challenge dominant interpretations of the President’s Committee on Fair Employment Practice (FEPC). Zamora’s boldest aim is to take issue with “whiteness scholars,” particularly Ian Haney Lopez and Neil Foley, who have argued that middle-class Mexican Americans such as the members of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) “made use of the official designation of Mexicans as ‘White’ to break with the black cause and, in some important cases, deliberately and even spitefully maintain the edifice of race.” (9) Although Zamora does not accomplish all of his goals, he does raise good questions about previous interpretations.

Disciplines
Publication Date
Spring 2011
Publisher Statement
DOI: 10.1353/jsh.2011.0002
Citation Information
Kevin Allen Leonard. "Review of: Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas: Mexican Workers and Job Politics during World War II, by Emilio Zamora" Journal of Social History Vol. 44 Iss. 3 (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kevin_leonard/43/