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Review of: LA City Limits: African American Los Angeles From the Great Depression to the Present
Pacific Historical Review
  • Kevin Allen Leonard, Western Washington University
Document Type
Book Review
Publication Date
11-1-2004
Disciplines
Abstract

Over the past twenty years a number of historians have attempted to explain why an African American “underclass” emerged in many U.S. cities after World War II. Most historians agree that racial discrimination in housing and employment and employers’ decisions to relocate factories to suburbs, other regions, and other countries left large numbers of African Americans trapped in increasingly impoverished and dangerous neighborhoods near the centers of these cities. The studies of “the urban crisis,” however, have focused primarily on northeastern cities. Josh Sides argues that an examination of the experiences of African Americans in Los Angeles will change historians’ understanding of this crisis.

Subjects - Topical (LCSH)
African Americans--California--Los Angeles--Social conditions--20th century; African Americans--California--Los Angeles--Economic conditions--20th century
Subjects - Names (LCNAF)
Sides, Josh, 1972. L.A. city limits
Geographic Coverage
Los Angeles (Calif.)--Race relations
Genre/Form
reviews (documents)
Type
Text
Language
English
Format
application/pdf
Citation Information
Kevin Allen Leonard. "Review of: LA City Limits: African American Los Angeles From the Great Depression to the Present" Pacific Historical Review Vol. 73 Iss. 4 (2004) p. 686 - 687
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kevin_leonard/2/