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Article
TRACER: an 'eye-opener' to the patient experience across the transition of care in an internal medicine resident program
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  • Lauren Meade, MD, Baystate Health
  • Reva Kleppel, Baystate Health
  • Kevin Hinchey, MD, Baystate Health
Document Type
Article, Peer-reviewed
Publication Date
4-1-2015
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A safe patient transition requires a complex set of physician skills within the interprofessional practice. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a rotation which applies self-reflection and workplace learning in a TRAnsition of CarE Rotation (TRACER) for internal medicine (IM) residents. TRACER is a 2-week required IM resident rotation where trainees join a ward team as a quality officer and follow patients into postacute care. METHODS: In 2010, residents participated in semistructured, one-on-one interviews as part of ongoing program evaluation. They were asked what they had learned on TRACER, the year prior, and how they used those skills in their practice. Using transcripts, the authors reviewed and coded each transcript to develop themes. RESULTS: Five themes emerged from a qualitative, grounded theory analysis: seeing things from the other side, the 'ah ha' moment of fragmented care, team collaboration including understanding nursing scope of practice in different settings, patient understanding, and passing the learning on. TRACER gives residents a moment to breathe and open their eyes to the interprofessional practice setting and the patient's experience of care in transition. CONCLUSIONS: Residents learn about transitions of care through self-reflection. This learning is sustained over time and is valued enough to teach to their junior colleagues.
Citation Information
Meade LB, Hall SL, Kleppel RW, Hinchey KT. TRACER: an 'eye-opener' to the patient experience across the transition of care in an internal medicine resident program. J Community Hosp Intern Med Perspect. 2015 Apr 1;5(2):26230.