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Presentation
Disclosure of HIV status is associated with internalized stigma of HIV/AIDS but not perceived stigma
21st Annual Meeting of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (2008)
  • Kenneth D. Phillips, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
  • L. Moneyham
  • C. Murdaugh
  • A. Tavakoli
Abstract

Stigma is one of the great challenges in the battle against HIV/AIDS. Goffman (1963) defined stigma as “an attribute that is deeply discrediting within a particular social interaction” (p. 3) and conceptualized stigma as arising from three different sources: physical deformity, blemishes of character, and tribal stigma of race, nation, and religion. Perceived stigma of HIV/AIDS (PSHA) is the belief that others in society will devalue and discriminate against them because they have HIV disease. Internalized stigma of HIV/AIDS (ISHA) refers to stigma which a person with HIV/AIDS has incorporated into their self-concept. Stigma may adversely affect many aspects of a person’s life. In particular, stigma may hinder self-disclosure of HIV status, which is necessary to receive needed services and social support.

Keywords
  • stigma,
  • HIV/AIDS,
  • internalized stigma,
  • perceived stigma
Disciplines
Publication Date
2008
Citation Information
Kenneth D. Phillips, L. Moneyham, C. Murdaugh and A. Tavakoli. "Disclosure of HIV status is associated with internalized stigma of HIV/AIDS but not perceived stigma" 21st Annual Meeting of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (2008)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kenneth_phillips/75/