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Legacy Effects Overwhelm the Short-Term Effects of Exotic Plant Invasion and Restoration on Soil Microbial Community Structure, Enzyme Activities, and Nitrogen Cycling
Oecologia (2011)
  • Kenneth J. Elgersma, University of Northern Iowa
  • Joan G. Ehrenfeld, Rutgers University
  • Shen Yu, Rutgers University
  • Torsten Vor, University of Göttingen
Abstract
Plant invasions can have substantial consequences for the soil ecosystem, altering microbial community structure and nutrient cycling. However, relatively little is known about what drives these changes, making it difficult to predict the effects of future invasions. In addition, because most studies compare soils from uninvaded areas to long-established dense invasions, little is known about the temporal dependence of invasion impacts. We experimentally manipulated forest understory vegetation in replicated sites dominated either by exotic Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii), native Viburnums, or native Vacciniums, so that each vegetation type was present in each site-type. We compared the short-term effect of vegetation changes to the lingering legacy effects of the previous vegetation type by measuring soil microbial community structure (phospholipid fatty acids) and function (extracellular enzymes and nitrogen mineralization). We also replaced the aboveground litter in half of each plot with an inert substitute to determine if changes in the soil microbial community were driven by aboveground or belowground plant inputs. We found that after 2 years, the microbial community structure and function was largely determined by the legacy effect of the previous vegetation type, and was not affected by the current vegetation. Aboveground litter removal had only weak effects, suggesting that changes in the soil microbial community and nutrient cycling were driven largely by belowground processes. These results suggest that changes in the soil following either invasion or restoration do not occur quickly, but rather exhibit long-lasting legacy effects from previous belowground plant inputs.
Keywords
  • Legacies Plant–soil interactions Phospholipid fatty acids Extracellular enzymes Berberis thunbergii
Disciplines
Publication Date
November, 2011
Citation Information
Kenneth J. Elgersma, Joan G. Ehrenfeld, Shen Yu and Torsten Vor. "Legacy Effects Overwhelm the Short-Term Effects of Exotic Plant Invasion and Restoration on Soil Microbial Community Structure, Enzyme Activities, and Nitrogen Cycling" Oecologia Vol. 167 Iss. 3 (2011) p. 733 - 745
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kenneth_elgersma/4/