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The Militant Davidic Messiah and Violence against Rome: The Influence of Pompey on the Development of Jewish and Christian Messianism
Scripta Judaica Cracoviensia (2011)
  • Kenneth Atkinson
Abstract
In 63 BCE the army of the Roman General Pompey the Great invaded ancient Palestine, destroyed part of the Jerusalem temple, and ended the nearly eighty-year-old Hasmonean state. The Romans thereafter ruled ancient Palestine either directly or through a series of client kings. The great Jewish War against the Romans of 66–70 CE was largely an effort to restore independent Jewish rule. The Jewish historian Josephus, who served as a general in this conflict, tells us that a messianic oracle inspired many Jews to take up arms against the Romans.1 This nearly five-year conflict ended with the Roman destruction of Jerusalem and the Jewish temple. Sixty-two years later, Simeon bar Kochba – presumed by many Jews to be the messiah – led Jewish rebels in a second ill-fated revolt against Roman rule. After this failed war, the Jewish community abandoned nationalism and the active hope that a messiah would violently overthrow their oppressors.
Keywords
  • Jews,
  • History,
  • The Militant Davidic Messiah,
  • Rome,
  • Pompey,
  • Jewish and Christian Messianism
Publication Date
February 15, 2011
DOI
10.4467/20843925SJ.11.001.0159
Citation Information
Kenneth Atkinson. "The Militant Davidic Messiah and Violence against Rome: The Influence of Pompey on the Development of Jewish and Christian Messianism" Scripta Judaica Cracoviensia Vol. 2011 Iss. 9 (2011) p. 7 - 19
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kenneth-atkinson/7/