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Herod the Great, Sosius, and the siege of Jerusalem (37 B.C.E.) in psalm of Solomon 17
Novum Testamentum (1996)
  • Kenneth Atkinson
Abstract
Psalm of Solomon 17 is a prayer containing the earliest explicit intertestamental expectation of a Davidic messiah. The first portion of the psalm expresses the condemnations of a devout Jew against illegitimate Jewish sinners who had wrongly usurped the Davidic throne, only to be subsequently overthrown by a foreign ruler (vss. 1-10). The oppression under this new regime had become so unbearable that the author’s community was forced to flee Jerusalem for their lives (vss. 11-17). The remainder of the psalm (vss. 21-46) is an extended plea describing the writer’s believe that the Lord’s Messiah will shortly overthrow both the local and foreign sinners and inaugurate an eternal reign of peace. Traditionally, most scholars have identified Pompey as the foreign ruler condemned throughout Ps. Sol. 17.
Publication Date
January 1, 1996
DOI
10.1163/1568536962613216
Citation Information
Kenneth Atkinson. "Herod the Great, Sosius, and the siege of Jerusalem (37 B.C.E.) in psalm of Solomon 17" Novum Testamentum Vol. 38 Iss. 4 (1996) p. 313 - 322
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kenneth-atkinson/23/