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The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls/The Pesharim and Qumran History: Chaos or Consensus?
(2004)
  • Kenneth Atkinson
Abstract
The two books examined in this review, both written by leading authorities in Qumran studies, explore the historical background of the Dead Sea Scrolls and archaeological site of Khirbet Qumran. Informed by a judicious use of textual evidence from the Dead Sea Scrolls, Jodi Magness's book, The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls, seeks to reconstruct the history of the Qumran settlement primarily through an analysis of its archaeological remains. James H. Charlesworth's study, The Pesharim and Qumran History, examines whether historical episodes are reflected in the pesharim and if there is currently a consensus regarding the most likely reconstruc tion of Qumran history in light of these documents. Archaeological analysis not only plays a central role in Charlesworth's reconstruction of Khirbet Qumran's occupational history, but to some extent provides the basis for his analysis of the pesharim and related Dead Sea Scrolls that likely reflect historical events. Because Magness and Charles worth present new analyses or interpretations of Khirbet Qumran's occupational history that substantially impact our understanding of the Dead Sea Scrolls, this review will examine some of the most significant issues raised in these two publications and their possible implications.
Publication Date
July 1, 2004
Citation Information
Kenneth Atkinson. "The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls/The Pesharim and Qumran History: Chaos or Consensus?" (2004)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kenneth-atkinson/15/