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Article
Contrast and Rater-Perspective Effects on Judgments of Sexual Harassment Severity: What He Thinks She Thinks, and Vice Versa
Journal of Business and Psychology
  • Kenneth J. Dunegan, Cleveland State University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2007
Abstract
We looked at whether ratings biases can influence judgments people make about sexually harassing behaviors. Online participants ( N = 176) read and rated the severity of complaint scenarios describing different incidents of alleged harassment. We manipulated: (1) contrast effects, by having people judge other, independent scenarios before judging a target scenario, and (2) rater-perspective effects, by having people judge from both a self- and then an opposite-gender perspective. For the former, we hypothesized that if judgments about harassment are qualitatively similar to judgments made in other areas (e.g., performance appraisal), they too should show contrast effects. For the latter, we hypothesized people would use stereotypes about the other gender, thereby overestimating the true (i.e., self-perspective driven) gender difference. Results supported both hypotheses, suggesting that decision makers should be aware of the possible influence of biases when judging whether behaviors constitute harassment. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
DOI
10.1007/s10869-007-9056-7
Citation Information
Pesta, B., Dunegan, K., & Hrivnak, M. (January 01, 2007). Contrast and Rater-Perspective Effects on Judgments of Sexual Harassment Severity: What He Thinks She Thinks, and Vice Versa. Journal of Business and Psychology, 22, 2, 155-165.